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Star Trek Enterprise episode review – Future Tense

Summary: The Enterprise encounters a ship from the future whose possession is immediately contested by both the Suliban and the Tholians.

The X-Files is often brought up when discussing Enterprise’s Temporal Cold War arc and with good reason. Like the X-Files, it’s full of star trek enterprise future tensemysterious forces, secret conflicts and strange mysteries. Also like the X-Files,the arc often seems light on content and heavy on suggestion. But where “Broken Bow,” “Cold Front” and “Shockwave” pursued conventional storytelling approaches via traditional action and suspense stories, “Future Tense”‘s real story is focused around the discovery of a ship from the future and the impact of the implications of that discovery on the crew. From T’Pol coming to terms with the reality of interspecies mating to Trip and Reed pondering whether it would be better to know the future or remain in the dark, this is what “Future Tense” does best and what it’s meant to do.

The action component of “Future Tense” though, which consists of Enterprise running from one place to another while being chased by CGI ships to be capped off by a Deus Ex Machina ending, is weak and peripheral to the core story. The action component mostly seems to exist in order to inject some excitement into a Sweeps episode and provide a reason for Enterprise to dispose of the 31st century ship. While the Tholian’s first appearance is intriguing, we’ve all seen Enterprise being chased around and blasted away at by Suliban cell ships more than enough times by now. It all feels formulaic and unnecessary especially when dangerously mounting radiation levels from the ship, or perhaps the fear that humans weren’t ready for such advanced technology, could have provided all the plot justification for activating the beacon in the first place.

Dropping Pandora’s Box into the lap of the characters is a standard SF plot and has been done on Star Trek plenty of times before but thanks to Enterprise’s prequel premise, “Future Tense” can open that box and show surprises inside that link directly to the back story not merely of the series but of the entire franchise. Enterprise has often mishandled this material by having Archer directly reference aspects of the future he couldn’t possibly know with terminology that was too on the nose (“Dear Doctor”), but FT gets it right by having the revelations come directly from the future in an unexpected way. In “Cold Front,” Daniels suggested that he was not entirely human and “Future Tense” explains what he meant as by the 31st century, a significant portion of the human race has apparently interbred with other species resulting in a hybridized humanity that is a significant and intriguing change. It’s also one that gives the Enterprise-era Humans and Vulcans in the pre-Spock era food for thought.

The 31st century ship itself, which in a Dr. Who vein, is bigger inside than outside is also a nice demonstration of future technology that also star trek enterprise future tenseallows the set designers to save money by using a smaller model. Thusfar TREK has not been very good at coming up with futuristic technology that would genuinely surpass anything we had seen in the 24th century, but this space-saver starship is the first futuristic technology to make it in. Trip and Reed’s Groundhog Day Effect juxtaposed with their topic of conversation served to give the ship’s powers credibility along with a real life demonstration of the impact of knowing what will come next and did it in a clever and offbeat way in a series that all too often delivers predictable dialogue and scenes that tell rather than show. “Shockwave 2” came far too close to giving us the distinct impression that the 31st century holds the same relationship to the 24th century as the Enterprise era does to our own; namely that the people were the same and the gadgets had improved a little but were still completely recognizable. “Future Tense”‘s tesseracting starship helps to restore some of that sense of mystery the 31st century is supposed to hold.

Like the aforementioned X-Files, FT does suffer from the problem of being an arc episode that unlike “Cold Front,” “Broken Bow” or “Shockwave” fails to significantly advance the story. It doesn’t reveal anything that moves the story forwards, it doesn’t develop the Tholians or the Suliban any further and it doesn’t really tell us much we didn’t already know. Its strength is in the character moments; it works best as the characters respond to the revelations as in the conversations between T’Pol and Dr. Phlox, T’Pol and Archer, and Reed and Trip. Its weakness comes about because an episode that should have stayed with those character moments is grafted onto action and fight scenes that aren’t really necessary and don’t work. In an attempt to inflate what should have been a smaller story into a bigger event episode, “Future Tense” almost loses touch with what makes the story work in the first place.

Next week: Archer’s beatings return as a major story focus as he goes off to Alien Prison.

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