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Star Trek Enterprise episode review – Cease Fire

Summary: Archer attempts to mediate between a Vulcan and Andorian territorial dispute.

“Cease Fire” is a much stronger follow up to “The Andorian Incident” than the rather mediocre “Shadows of P’Jem,” which saw Enterprise’s star trek enterprise cease fire entire command crew blunder into getting captured and remaining outside observers to much of the action. “Cease Fire” by contrast sees Trip taking a strong command posture where in “Shadows” he was reduced to yelling ineffectually at the Vulcan commander. Archer and T’Pol again find themselves in hostile territory but Archer maintains control of the situation and does his best to find solutions. The Andorians and Vulcans are also far better developed here than they were in either “Andorian Incident” or “Shadows”. Though the Vulcans are still portrayed rather unsympathetically and the episode makes it clear the writers’ own sympathies lie more with the Andorians than the Vulcans, this is still the first time Ambassador Soval has been developed at all and portrayed as anything but an arrogant and bigoted martinet.

Between the special UPN promos, two major franchise guest stars and top notch production values in the planetside scenes, the action scenes and gorgeous CGI work on the Vulcan and Andorian ships, “Cease Fire” seems to have had the benefit of a special push from the producers and the network. More money has been spent on-screen and this time out it’s been combined with a fairly good script to make for the best Vulcan\Andorian episode to date. Like “Andorian Incident” and “Shadows of P’Jem,” “Cease Fire” does suffer from the outsider syndrome in which the crew are outsiders intervening between quarreling aliens. Where the previous two episodes both tried to resolve this dramatic problem by having Archer and T’Pol taken hostage, “Fire” avoids such obviously cheesy gimmicks in favor of more generalized ‘behind enemy lines’ sequences.

While it does end up deploying the hoary formula of the fanatical subordinate contrasted with the more sympathetic leader as the central dilemma whose resolution comes when the former is exposed to the latter, it’s still preferable to the fanatical leader contrasted with the more sympathetic subordinate, which Voyager’s latter seasons used almost non-stop. This formula is still a widely used television cliche and although Plakson’s part is woefully underwritten, the actors do what they can to give each line their own unique style and spin. It doesn’t always work and Plakson’s stylized film noir delivery, which worked quite well during her TNG appearances is often out of place, especially in her final scene, it still makes the material more interesting to watch and lifts the dialogue somewhat above its formulaic roots.

By contrast there are flashes of clever and off-beat dialogue such as the battlefield exchange between T’Pol and Ambassador Soval, which

star trek enterprise cease fire

“Cease Fire” could have used more of instead of the old standbys about war, negotiation and peace that marked Combs and Plakson’s repartee and any Star Trek viewer has already heard time and time again. There is just enough good dialogue in “Cease Fire” to cause one to wonder if Chris Black wasn’t being held back by the producers from being a little more adventurous with the lines in a few of the key scenes. Devoting some more time to developing Shran’s character with scenes that don’t necessarily directly advance the plot would also be a good idea. Combs’ Weyoun made quite an impression in a single episode mainly because time was dedicated to developing his race and his character even in an episode where he was doomed to be killed off by the end. By comparison we still know very little about the Andorians except that they are part of an Empire, are angry a lot of the time and don’t much like the Vulcans and that isn’t a lot to go on when building the identity of an entire species.

“Cease Fire,” though is a good place to start laying the ground work. Shran here develops more of a personality and thus an identity and even a sense of humor. Ambassador Soval gets a background and a history and a somewhat dry sense of humor of his own. Archer manages to go through most of the episode acting like an able and competent Starship Captain who can think on his feet without behaving foolishly and can act as a diplomat instead of ranting over the slightest insult. T’Pol manages to get more relevant character development in an episode not even centered around her, than she did in the T’Pol-centered “Stigma.” Phlox manages to steal another sickbay scene that doesn’t even center around him and Trip gets another moment in the sun.

Trip’s threat to fire on the two groups of ships is a bit on the irrational side considering the legal fact that Starfleet had been called to mediate the dispute and had no territorial status here and the practical fact that based on what we’ve seen up till now, any single one of the ships from either fleet could have taken Enterprise apart without breaking a sweat. Still, it harks back to proper TOS tradition and by playing it as much for comic value as suspense through Archer’s last minute message, it avoids the kind of overblown self-righteousness such scenes usually involve for Archer. The fact that Trineer is also a better actor and Trip a more likeable character than Archer undoubtedly helped as well.

All in all, “Cease Fire” could have used a more original plot but still has plenty of memorable character moments, snips of memorable dialogue, and noteworthy production values while effectively advancing the galactic drama of the Federation’s founding.

Next week: From Andorians and Vulcans to Suliban, Oh My.

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